How To Do Kegels

4 Best Positions to do Kegel Exercises - Kegels Physical Therapy (for Beginners)


Here are 4 of the best positions to do Kegel exercises (for beginners) with Physical Therapist Michelle Kenway from https://www.pelvicexercises.com.au For more Kegel Exercise videos: - Kegels Workout for Beginners https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRKhtfbJHdo&t=1s - How to do Kegels https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfmWkHSOi7U&t=280s It can be difficult to do Kegel exercises if you're starting out. The 4 Kegel positions shown in this video involve lying down and sitting. The lying down positions reduce the force of gravity on your pelvic floor sometimes making Kegels easier. The sitting Kegel exercise positions shown in this video can help you feel your pelvic floor muscles working against gravity. Ultimately the goal of pelvic floor training is to progress to doing your Kegels into standing position so that your pelvic floor muscles work well when you're upright (when you need them most). The 4 best positions to do Kegel exercises demonstrated in this video are: 1. Lying down on your back (knees bent or straight) 2. Side lying 3. Lying on your stomach 4. Sitting on an exercise ball or on a chair with good posture and no back support Best Sitting Position to do Kegels Your sitting posture during Kegel exercises affects the success of strtengthening. Your Physical Therapist will encourage you to sit using tall posture during Kegel exercises. Sitting with your back away from the back rest of the chair with an inward curve in the lower back involve greater pelvic floor muscle activation than supported sitting against the chair. (1) Pelvic floor muscle activation progressively increases from lying down, to sitting and then standing positions. (2) It’s important to progress Kegels from lying down into upright anti gravity positions since your muscles strengthen best in the posture in which they are trained. (3) This is why women who commence Kegels training lying down are usually progressed into sitting and standing positions by their Physical Therapist. References: 1. Sapsford R, Richardson C, Stanton W. (2006) Sitting posture affects pelvic floor muscle activity in parous women: An observational study. Australian Journal of Physiotherapy. Volume 52, Issue 3, Pages 219-222. 2. Vereecken R, Derluyn J, and Verduyn H. (1975) Electromyography of the perineal striated muscles during cystometry. Urology International 30: 92–98. 3. Wilson G, Murphy A, Walshe A. (1996) The specificity of strength training: the effect of posture. Eur J Appl Physiol. 73:346–352.